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FAQs and documents

Making payments

 

Direct Debit

Print, complete and sign a direct debit form (PDF 104KB). This form can be returned to us by:

Post:  Capital Finance Australia Limited, Customer Service Department, 1 King Street, Concord West NSW 2138

Email: customerservice@capital-finance.com.au

BPAY Call our customer service team on 1300 300 309 to confirm your personalised BPAY reference numbers

 

Additional payments can be made to your contract in addition to your agreed contractual payments. Additional payments will place your contract into an advance status when payments are up to date. Early termination fees will apply if you pay out your contract early.

 

If your loan is in arrears or might fall into arrears due to a dishonoured or late payment, it is important you advise us at the earliest opportunity by calling one of our payment specialists on 1300 300 309.

 

Payment arrangements may be available during times of financial hardship or disaster relief. To discuss your payment options please call us on 1800 642 626, 8:30pm – 7:30pm Monday – Thursday, 8:30am to 5:30pm Friday (AEST).

In order to pay off your loan early it is important you contact us to confirm an agreed payout figure. A payout figure can be obtained by calling us on 1300 300 309.

Please note:

Paying out a loan early may incur early termination fees.

The payout figure may change if not paid within the time permitted.

Account admin

By:

 

Please note the provision of a loan statement may incur an administration fee.

 

Name changes due to deed poll changes (personal contracts) and registered name changes (business contracts) will need to be submitted via email – customerservice@capital-finance.com.au.

 

Supporting documentation (certified by a Justice of the Peace) such as marriage certificate, change of name certificate or registration of a change of business name will need to be submitted when lodging a change of name request.

 

Yes. We will require a signed Letter of Authority form (PDF 66KB) submitted in advance and signed by the contract holder(s) and any applicable guarantor(s). A lodged authority will remain in place unless revoked in writing by the contract holders.

 

Please note – this form authorises a third party to act on the contract holder’s behalf for information purposes only – to discuss account, overdue payments and general information only.

 

Finance

This depends on the type of loan you have:


Chattel Mortgage, Hire/Term Purchase, Finance Lease, Novated Lease – once all contractual payments have been made the goods belong to the customer and there is no other action required.

 

Rental agreement – you have four end-of-term options   : 

  • Extend the rental period
  • Return the equipment with no further payments required (subject to return conditions)
  • You can make an offer to purchase the equipment at fair market value, or;
  • Any combination of the above that best suits your requirements.

 

That’s okay. There are a number of options available including agreeing an adjustment to incorporate the cost of the new equipment, or agreeing to a change to the term if you want to keep your repayments the same. You'll need to contact us to discuss your options.

 

For rental agreements by executing our variation agreement on your rental agreement. The variation agreement allows you to add the new equipment and either:  

  •  Increase the repayments without extending the term; or
  • Extend the repayment term to maintain a similar quarterly repayment as per your existing rental agreement.  

 

For other products – you can apply for a new loan which, subject to credit approval, can match your existing term.

If you cancel the arrangement and return the equipment before the end of the repayment term, you may be required to pay for the balance owing. A payout figure can be obtained by calling us on 1300 300 309.

There may be taxation advantages – you should check with your accountant or financial advisor.

 

Other

Most equipment is covered by the manufacturer’s warranty (check with your supplier). Beyond that, you are responsible for repairs and maintenance and to keep the equipment in good working order and insured at all times.

Fair market value is the estimated amount for which an asset should exchange between a willing buyer and a willing seller in an arm’s length transaction after reasonable time and proper marketing.

 

You need to:

  1. Report the scam to Capital Finance immediately at hoax@capital-finance.com.au
  2. Delete it straight away from your inbox and sent folder if you’ve forwarded it.

 

Your State Manager is happy to help.  Contact details can be found here.

Indigenous customers who are unable to present a Primary or Secondary identification document can now provide either of the following:

  • A completed Remote Indigenous Communities Verification Form
  • Approved Indigenous Community ID Cards

We aim to help Australians living with dementia remain financially independent for as long as possible and be less vulnerable to financial abuse.

About dementia and financial management

There are over 447,000 Australians living with dementia today. As our population ages, this number is expected to grow to 1 million Australians by 2058.

We know that financial management is one of those extremely important areas where those living with dementia can experience great stress and anxiety. It can become hard to absorb information from banking staff or your financial advisor, and hard to stay in control of your money. Things that you found easy before – such as checking bank statements and paying bills – may become more difficult.

We also understand that coming into a busy bank branch can become stressful and confusing. We want to help our customers living with dementia to be able to manage their financial arrangements and remain independent for as long as possible. We also want to help protect these customers from financial abuse.

Setting up an enduring power of attorney

Consider planning ahead by setting up a power of attorney.

A power of attorney is a legal document that gives another person the right to make financial and/or legal decisions on your behalf. You may have heard of two types of power of attorney – ‘general’ and ‘enduring’. While a general power of attorney ends when you lose mental capacity, an enduring power of attorney remains valid over time – even when you are no longer able to make your own decisions. You can set it up now to start at a later time specified by you, or when you no longer have the capacity to manage your financial and legal affairs. Equally you can set it up to start as soon as the attorney has accepted his/her appointment. When granting a power of attorney you can put limits on what your attorney can do.

If you do not have these plans in place then a court, tribunal, Public Advocates Office or health assessment board may need to appoint someone to take care of this for you.

It is important to choose someone you trust as your attorney. You need to feel confident they will act in your best interests.

This person could be your spouse, child, another relative or friend. Alternatively, it could be an independent person, such as the Public Trustee, or your solicitor. Whoever you appoint needs to understand their responsibilities and legal obligations as an attorney.

Some people prefer to appoint two people jointly to be their enduring powers of attorney. If you do this, you need to be confident that they will generally agree on decisions and what is in your best interests. They should live in close proximity to each other to perform their duties as your joint attorneys.

No matter who you appoint, you should discuss your decision with your family so everyone knows and understands your wishes and use a lawyer to help you put the right sort of power of attorney in place.

Protecting your money and safety

We can work with you or the person you have granted a power of attorney to help you protect your money in line with your best interests. This includes setting up automated options to protect your money in the future such as withdrawal limits and direct debits on certain accounts.

Once you become dependent on others for your day to day care or social contact, you do become more vulnerable to financial abuse.

Other source of support

 

 

Financial abuse can happen to anyone. People can be particularly vulnerable to financial abuse when they are dependent on family members and other people for their day-to-day care or social contact.

  • Call 000 if you are in immediate danger.
  • To speak with a specialist team who can help you manage your finances during difficult circumstances call Priority Assist on 1800 080 470.

What is financial abuse?

Financial abuse occurs when someone manipulates your financial decision-making, or misuses or controls your money, financial resources, or property or assets without your knowledge or consent.

Financial abuse can happen to anyone, at any time, no matter their age, gender or sexual orientation. People who are dependent on family members and other people for their day-to-day care or social contact can be particularly vulnerable to financial abuse.

A ‘financial abuser’ can be someone you hardly know or someone you have known all your life. They could be family members, friends, acquaintances or strangers who befriend you. They may also be professionals or caregivers employed to help you.

There can be many different reasons why financial abuse starts. For example:

  • A person may feel a sense of entitlement to your money.
  • Someone in a position of trust, such as an attorney or person appointed to manage your affairs, may not be well-equipped for that role.
  • It may be a gradual change, where someone initially managing your money responsibly begins to take advantage opportunistically.
  • It’s important to remember that there are no circumstances in which financial abuse is acceptable, so if you think this might be happening to you, don’t be afraid to get help.

Protect yourself from financial abuse

To help protect yourself from financial abuse:

  • If someone asks for money, discuss it first with a trusted family member or friend.
  • Get your affairs in order. Talk to Capital Finance Australia Limited about setting up direct debits and pre-authorised bill payments. Consider who has third party authorisations over your accounts and ensure that they are trusted.
  • Consider planning for the future to ensure your wishes are followed by carefully choosing and setting up a trustworthy person to act as your representative with power of attorney. A power of attorney is a legal document that gives another person the right to make financial and/or legal decisions on your behalf. You may have heard of two types of power of attorney – ‘general’ and ‘enduring’. A general power of attorney is in place for a particular period of time or for a particular purpose – for example if you are away from home for an extended period. An enduring power of attorney remains valid over time – even when you are no longer able to make your own decisions. You can set it up now to start at a later time specified by you, or when you no longer have the capacity to manage your financial and legal affairs. Equally you can set it up to start as soon as the attorney has accepted their appointment. When granting a power of attorney you can put limits on what your attorney can do. 
  • Never rush into a financial decision. Ask for details in writing and get a second opinion or independent advice. 
  • Feel free to say ‘no’ – it’s your money.
  • Trust your instincts – if something doesn’t feel right, it may not be right.
  • Keep track of your finances, investments and other assets by checking your bank statements regularly to make sure there have been no unauthorised transactions.
  • Order a copy of your credit report once a year to check for anything unexpected.
  • Open your own mail if you can.
  • Stay in touch with the people you trust and care about.
  • If you choose to lend money to someone, summarise the arrangement in a letter or email and set up a repayment plan.
  • Never sign a document or make a large financial decision unless you understand the terms and what your obligations are. If I doubt, seek independent legal advice.
  • We can help you put a number of protection measures in place such as withdrawal notification alerts and withdrawal limits on accounts.

Understanding whether you may be experiencing financial abuse

It can be hard to recognise when you are experiencing financial abuse – particularly when the abuser is someone you have placed your trust in, or are dependent on for aspects of your care. It often involves actions over a period of time.

Warning signs may include:

  • Another person is accessing or controlling your bank accounts or credit cards or using them without your consent.
  • You are being pressured to change your will, power of attorney or other legal arrangements.
  • A friend or family member is pressuring you to appoint them as your enduring power of attorney.
  • The person you've appointed as your power of attorney is not acting in your best interests. For example they're taking money from your bank account to pay their bills.
  • Your signature has been forged on cheques, bank accounts or legal documents.
  • You are being pressured to sign a document, such as a blank withdrawal form or blank loan application, or feel you are being misled about what you are being asked to sign.
  • Your bills haven't been paid, even though you have entrusted someone to do this for you.
  • You are being asked to pay an unreasonable amount for services. For example handy work around the house, car repair.
  • Your money is being used for a purpose other than what you wanted.
  • Your cheques are being cashed without your permission or authorisation, or some of the funds are being withheld from you.
  • You are being pressured to invest money in schemes that sound too good to be true.
  • Large or unexplained withdrawals or transfers have been made from your bank account.
  • You're no longer receiving your mail, including account statements, and you don't know why.
  • You are being isolated from your family or friends, or threatened with being isolated if you don't give the abuser what they want.
  • Your property or possessions are being used without your permission.
  • You are feeling pressured to take out a loan for another person’s benefit.
  • You are feeling pressured to act as a guarantor when you feel you don’t understand enough about the transaction and the risks involved, or simply don’t want to act in a guarantor role.
  • You are being made to pay for someone else’s expenses. For example someone shares a home with you and does not contribute to bills, maintenance and other expenses.
  • You are being made to feel guilty if you don't give money to the abuser or their family.

How can we help

We understand that it can be hard to talk about, or take action to stop financial abuse. In our branches, you are entitled to speak with one of our staff members separately from your support person, friend or carer. When you tell us that you suspect financial abuse, depending on your personal circumstances, we may:

  • Put activity on your accounts on hold or delay a specific transaction or set of transactions while we investigate your situation. This may prevent any transactions being made, including by anyone holding a power of attorney, administration or guardianship order.
  • Check that any person acting on your behalf appears to have appropriate authorisation based on the information available to us.
  • Help you to understand your existing financial arrangements with us.
  • Help you change any online banking logon details and PINs to help protect your money and the security of your information. Please note this may not be appropriate in circumstances where an abuser controlling your finances may potentially become violent.
  • Help you change the address for any mail that we send to you, including any new cards. You may wish to nominate the address of a trusted person, or your local branch.
  • If you are in financial difficulty or have concerns in relation to debts owed to Capital Finance Australia Limited, including payment to joint loans, you can call the Priority Assist team directly on 1800 080 470. The team will determine assistance on a case by case basis, for example, varying loan repayments and/or extending terms to make repayments more affordable.

Understanding your rights

If you believe you may be experiencing financial abuse, you should seek legal advice. You may be able to obtain free legal advice from a community legal centre or Legal Aid office in your state or territory. See the ASIC website for details.

Accessing guidance on fraud and scams

Financial abuse is not the same as a fraud or scam, although financial abuse can sometimes involve fraud.

Accessing other sources of information and support

Crisis support

Lifeline. Lifeline provides Australians experiencing a personal crisis with 24 hour crisis support and suicide prevention services. Call 13 11 14.

Financial abuse and how to protect yourself

Powers of attorneys, guardianship and administration

Support and advocacy

Financial difficulty

If you are feeling overwhelmed by your debt situation, you may want to consider contacting the National Debt Helpline which offers a free, independent and confidential financial counselling service. A financial counsellor can help you with your overall debt situation, advise you on what other benefits or support you might be entitled to, advocate on your behalf with all your creditors and refer you on to other appropriate support services in your local area.

 

 

Domestic and family violence can happen to anyone and cause you to live in fear. You may need help in protecting or strengthening your financial independence, managing your finances safely if and when you leave, or rebuilding for a secure long-term future.
 Call 000 if you are in immediate danger.

  • To access 24/7 counselling and support call 1800RESPECT on 1800 737 732 or visit 1800RESPECT.
  • To speak with a specialist team who can help you manage your finances during difficult circumstances call Priority Assist on 1800 080 470.

 

What is domestic and family violence?

Domestic and family violence can happen to anyone, at any time, no matter their age, gender, sexual orientation, geographic location, cultural or religious beliefs, or economic status.

Capital Finance Australia defines domestic and family violence as behaviour by a person towards a current or former family member that:

  • Is physically or sexually abusive;
  • Is emotionally or psychologically abusive;
  • Is economically abusive (limiting access to money or impacting overall financial wellbeing);
  • Is threatening or coercive;
  • Controls or dominates the family member in any other way, causing that family member to fear for their safety or wellbeing, or that of a family member or another person; or
  • Causes a child to hear, witness, or otherwise be exposed to the effects of other domestic and family violence behaviours.

Every person’s situation is unique and the right actions for you will depend on your individual circumstances. We can help you as you make decisions about your circumstances.

Maintaining and regaining control of your finances

We understand that any separation can be a time of financial difficulty. In some cases, financial worry can be a barrier to leaving a violent situation. Customers experiencing domestic and family violence who would like to discuss financial difficulty or concerns in relation to debts owed to Capital Finance Australia Limited, including payment of joint loans, can call the Priority Assist team directly on 1800 080 470. The team will determine assistance on a case by case basis, which may include for example:

  • Giving you time and space, for example varying loan repayments and / or extending terms for short term financial relief until you are able to discuss your longer-term plans.
  • Reviewing your banking needs. For example, you might consider switching to a low rate credit card.

We can help you to work through your financial arrangements and separate them from your family member, where possible. We understand that gaining financial self-sufficiency can often be the difference between staying in or leaving a violent situation.

You can access a range of Money Health Calculators and Toolkits on the ASIC website.

In some cases, we may refer you to an independent and free financial counselling service. A financial counsellor can help you with your overall financial situation, advise you on what other benefits or support you might be entitled to, and refer you on to the appropriate family violence support services in your local area.

Understanding your rights

You may be able to obtain free legal advice from a community legal centre or Legal Aid office in your state or territory.

Accessing other sources of information and support

General support
  • 1800 RESPECT provides access to telephone or online counselling, information on safety planning, and information on how to support someone who is experiencing domestic and family violence. Call 1800 737 732.
  • Lifeline provides Australians experiencing a personal crisis with 24 hour crisis support and suicide prevention services. Call 13 11 14.
Local Support
Additional Counselling support
  • Relationships Australia provides support groups and counselling on relationships, and for abusive and abused partners. To be connected to the nearest Relationships Australia, call 1300 364 277.
  • Aboriginal Family Domestic Violence Hotline. Victims Services has a dedicated contact line for Aboriginal victims of crime who would like information on victims’ rights, how to access counselling and financial assistance. Call 1800 019 123.
  • The Victims Access Line provides free counselling and financial assistance for victims of crime. Call 1800 633 063 or the Aboriginal contact line on 1800 019 123.
Accommodation
  • NSW – Family & Community Services Link2home Domestic Violence Line. Call 1800 656 463.
Legal and Financial Support
Support for Men
  • Mensline Australia provides a free service offering national telephone and online support, information and referrals for men with family and relationship concerns. Call 1300 789 978.
Support for Children
  • Child Protection Helpline – 132 111
  • Kids Helpline. Free, private and confidential, telephone and online counselling service specifically for young people aged between 5 and 25 in Australia. Call 1800 551 800.
  • Australian Childhood Foundation. Counselling for children and young people affected by abuse. Call 1800 176 453 / 03 9874 3922.

 

Feedback & complaints

At Capital Finance, we welcome your suggestions, compliments and complaints as an opportunity to improve our service, provide feedback to our staff and put things right when we have let you down. You can contact Capital Finance on 1300 300 309 (weekdays 8.30am – 6.00pm AEST) or email dispute_resolution@capital-finance.com.au

If you’re ever unhappy about something we’ve done – or perhaps not done – please give us the opportunity to put things right.

Our aim is to resolve your complaint within 5 working days, however, where possible we will resolve your complaint on the spot. If we need some additional time to get back to you, we will let you know. Should we be unable to resolve your concern at your first point of contact, we will then refer the complaint to our dedicated Customer Solutions team.

Our Customer Managers are here to find a solution for you and will ensure that you're regularly updated about the progress we are making to resolve your complaint.

If you are still unhappy

If you are not satisfied with our response or handling of your complaint, you can contact the Capital Finance Customer Advocate (Customer Advocate) or the external dispute resolution scheme, the Australian Financial Complaints Authority (AFCA). Time limits apply to complain to AFCA. Please refer to AFCA’s website set out below for details.

Customer Advocate

The role of the Customer Advocate is to provide an independent review of the outcome of your complaint. The Customer Advocate operates separately from our day to day business areas and its recommendations are binding on the bank. If you choose to contact the Customer Advocate first, you can still refer your complaint to AFCA if you remain dissatisfied. The Customer Advocate will advise you of the kinds of complaints they can help with.
 

The Customer Advocate can be contacted by email or mail:

customeradvocate@westpac.com.au

Customer Advocate, Reply Paid 5265, Sydney NSW 2001

Please include the following information in your correspondence to the Customer Advocate;

  • Your customer number and complaint reference number
  • Your preferred contact details
  • A brief description of your complaint

Australian Financial Complaints Authority

The Australian Financial Complaints Authority (AFCA) is not part of Capital Finance. AFCA provides a free and independent service to resolve complaints by consumers and small businesses about financial firms (e.g. banks), where that complaint falls within AFCA’s terms of reference.

The contact details for AFCA are set out below.

Australian Financial Complaints Authority

Online: www.afca.org.au
Email: info@afca.org.au
Phone: 1800 931 678 (free call)
Mail: Australian Financial Complaints Authority, GPO Box 3 Melbourne VIC 3001

Other alternatives

Other options may be available to you.  You may wish to get legal advice from your community legal centre or Legal Aid.

You can also contact ASIC, the regulator, for information on 1300 300 630 or through ASIC’s website at www.asic.gov.au